Friday, August 11, 2006

CLASSIFIEDS >> 08-12-06

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE LEADER'S CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to The Leader Classifieds, P.O. Box 766, Jacksonville,AR 72078. Deadline to advertise in Wednesday issue is 5 p.m. Friday and 5 p.m. Thursday for the Weekend issue.

Consignment Boutique for sale in Cabot, great clientele, great consignors. In business for 6 years, low cost investment. Ready for new owner. Please call 628-4110 for information.

Mountain hunt club has openings. 3,100 acres. Timber & bottomland hunting. Cost is $350 annual membership. Family oriented. Located near Social Hill/Malvern area. (501)766-5105, (501)985-5240.

Estate Sale by J&K of Lavon and Kendal Wells, 121 Poppy Lane, Cabot, AR. August 10,11,12, at 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Thurs, Fri, Sat. Antique pine bedroom furniture, king size bed and mattress, rocker, sleeper sofa, chairs, kitchen, glassware, linens, silk florals, decorative, books, jewelry, tools, shop, raw oak lumber, concrete blocks and much more. Go approximately 3 miles on Kerr Station Road toward Jacksonville to Poppy Lane. Watch for signs.

HELP WANTED

OFFICE HELP WANTED Whit Davis Lumber Plus is looking for an experianced Accounts Receivable/Accounts Payable person who also knows Excell and Word. This position may split time between the Jacksonville and Cabot locations. We offer competive wages, paid holidays, health insurance,vacation and a 401(k) plan. Please send a resume to: Whit Davis Lumber Plus, 723 School Dr, Jacksonville, AR.72076, Attn.: AR/AP

Wanted: Experienced sales representative in wholesale industry. Highest paid commission around. Call Melinda or Rhonda at (501) 843-8396.

kiddieland nazarine daycare accepting applications for bus driver/teacher. Must be able to work flexible hours and work in all departments. Call Wanda or Carol at 501-982-5271.

Seeking a loving childcare giver to work with babies & preschoolers. Tuesday from 8:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m. &/or Wednesday 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. at a church in Cabot. Must see this as a ministry & must have references. $7.75 per hour. Call (870)256-3032.

0/0- Are you paid for all your miles + FSC+mileage bonus+safety bonus? We pay all that and more. 877-417-5545.* 09/06
taking applications for a part-time housekeeper at LRAFB clinic. Good pay & benefits. For more information, call & ask for Mary 987-7314.

janitorial. Part-time position available in the Beebe and Ward areas. Top pay and medical insurance. Background check will be required. Call 501-791-2900 or 1-800-791-2902 Mon-Fri 10:00 am - 6:00 pm.

Need Experienced Dance Teacher. Tap, Ballet, Hip Hop, Jazz, etc. Call Carla 501-843-4968, 501-239-0026. Carla’s Dance Company in Cabot.

NOW HIRING Administrative opportunity w/ NLR company. Requires Microsoft word, excel, quickbooks pro, A/P & the ability to multi task. Excellent Pay for this screen hire position. For more information call Skill Span at:1-866-538-1500.

Needed Volunteer Singers for retirement centers & nursing homes. Daytime hours. Call Herb 985-3538.

Quality Child Development Center looking for loving care givers who will promote a learning enviroment for young children. If you are a team player, hard worker, patient, loving, dependable, and enjoy working with children. Please call %01-605-9228. Immediate full time position available.

help wanted Cabot Cleaners drycleaning presser. Apply in person at 621 West Main, Cabot. See Sam.

General Assembly Get the job you deserve!
Full & Part-Time!
At Staff Management we reward our employees with weekly paychecks, flexible schedules and a fun and casual work environment. Join Staff Management today at the nation’s leader in DVD packaging! Various positions avail. including: Shipping, Pick & Pack and Assembly.
Part-Time 4 or 6 hour
shifts
North LR, off I-440
Plant operates 24x7
New Insurance, Up to $7.50/hr.
No experience needed, must be 18
Immediate openings on
all shifts
Night openings 6 pm-6am.
Call for interview times and
directions!
1-888-412-5627
extension, LNG-S63.

full-time Graphic and Web site designer needed for busy newspaper in Jacksonville. Must be proficient in In Design, Photoshop, Illustrator, Quark Express, Acrobat in a Mac environment. Primarily daytime hours. Competitive pay, good benefits. Call Eileen at 982-9421 or email resume to efeldman@arkansasleader.com or fax to 985-0026. EOE

full-time Paginator with good copy-editing skills needs for busy-twice weekly newspaper in Jacksonville. Primarily daytime hours in a Mac environment. Must be proficient in InDesign, Quark, Photoshop and Acrobat. Web skills definitely a plus. Competitive pay and benefits. Contact Eileen at 982-9421 or send resume to efeldman@arkansasleader.com or fax to 985-0026. EOE

Cook & van driver needed. Apply in person at:Cabot Patch Kids, 1273 Campground Road, Cabot, AR.

Clerical Opportunities Variety of positions in NLR & LR. Pay DOE. Call SkillSpan 866-538-1500 for application times.*

Cabot united methodist Great opportunity to work with young children in a quality childcare setting. Part-time, afternoon teachers needed for upcoming Fall term. Please, contact the Cabot United Methodist CDC, 2003 S. Pine, 843-9226.

attention: Local company has several positions now available. No experience necessary. Company training provided. All positions are permanent with rapid advancement. Must be high school graduate and able to start immediately. Positions start at $485 per week. For interview call 941-1421.

Services

weddings by nori. Complete Wedding Services starting at $200! 2-24 guest packages, elegant, affordable and fast. Call 834-7530 or 834-4587 for details.*

Bookkeeping services All monthly bookkeeping services provided such as sales tax, quarterly and yearly payroll tax reports, payroll preparation and general accounting. Pickup and deliver. Over 25 years experience. Call 501-941-5482.*

Experienced Elderly caregiver. Licensed. Full or part-time. Flexible hours. (501)819-0143.*

landscaping contractor specializing in sprinklers, sod, flower beds & trees. Free estimates. Low rates. Individual & commercial. Licensed & bonded. Contact Michael 501-230-6684.

FURNITURE & APPLIANCES

gE kitchen stove, gas, good condition $60. 501-676-5441.

ROCKER-RECLINER love seat/couch, $400, Sony Trinitron 36” (2 yrs old) TV, $300, Large entertainment center, $300, coffee/end tables, $100. All in great condition! 501-416-1984.

TODDLER BED: Little Tikes blue race car w/ mattress, pad, and red sheets. $80 605-1146.

washer whirlpool asking $100, Dryer Amana brand $100. Good condition, about 5 years old (501)920-8490.

New queensize 10” thick foam mattress $400. Complete full-sized bed set $100. (501)983-9331. Call anytime.

Beautiful late 1800’s Colonial style bed with tall headboard, dresser with mirror, washstand with mirror. Ready to sell. $1,000 obo. Baldwin piano, good condition. (501)605-2873.

ashley black lacque w/chrome trim. 8 piece queen bedroom set. $850 obo. Call 501-563-3494.

Whirlpool washer heavy duty, white, look good, runs good. $75 (501)658-1209.

Entertainment Center/Wall unit, 4 piece oak made by Riverside, excellent condition. $600. Call 501-982-2863.

Gas stove hot point works. $100. 241-0760.

Refrig, Side by Side, Ice + Water in the door, white, needs freon. $75.00 501-605-3512.

2 Baby walkers and an infant seat. 259-0615.

large dresser and chest of drawers. 835-3147.

Suede Sofa cream color, super nice $100.Loveseat, flowers, no tears $40 501-455-3898.

New table Solid oak, 5 feet long, has 2, 2 1/2’ extension leaves, 2 captain’s chairs, 2 regular chairs-both pairs with fancy carving. 882-5546, after 5 p.m.

World War ii era sofa & chair set with bear claw chair & coffee table, good condition, asking $500.(501)843-3619.

Dillards sofa & chair set with coffee table, like new, asking $600. (501) 843-3619.

Microfiber Couch light brown with recliners on both sides asking $300, end tables (make offer) baby odds and ends.(501) 628-4572.

china cabinet $275. Fireplace screen with glass doors. $30. 501-941-7976.

reclining loveseat, navy blue, velvet. Great condition. Paid $500, sacrifice $300. Bookshelf, medium brown, 7’ tall, 3 shelves, 2 doors. $15. Toddler bed, white metal. Great condition. $15. 501-626-8539.

for sale: washer & dryer, couch & matching love seat, queen size bedroom suite & a treadmill. Please call for pricing. Ask for Jessica or Richard. 501-773-3890 or 773-3891.

MISCELLANEOUS

Duramil by Pacer. Hospital Grade, Heavy Duty Treadmill. $125. Call 843-3818.

Pack’n play bouncy saucer, take-a long swing. $20 each. 843-3103.

2 lawn mowers $50 each, toilet bowels $10 & up, storm doors $30 & up, attic doors $35 & sheet rock 1/2” $4 each. 982-8844.

for sale: 27” GE Color TV $50, Call 501-982-3447.

PSE Compound bow with hard case & accessories asking $150 negotiable. Hoyt Rebel Bow Fishing Bow with 2 arrows & rell $75 negotiable. (501)941-5071.

86” Covered board window valence with wingback chair covered to match. 843-6769.

King sized waterbed includes semi waveless mattress & heater. $250 firm. (501)941-5071.

Pair or Heresy 1, for serious inquiries only, great vintage speakers, with free stand, excellent condition. Call for details. 882-2142.

george foreman indoor/outdoor grill w/pedestal. Can be used with or w/o pedestal. Brand new. Never used. Have all instructions. $75 obo. 501-743-8771. Leave message if no answer.

Weider C4800 home gym. $300 obo. Golds gym 60lbs punching bag w/stand. $175 obo. Call 501-960-7095

Pro form exercise bike. 2-4ft. sliding closet doors, 6 interior doors w/jams. 3 ft. doors w/framing. 882-5365. Make offer.

Stainless Steel tank, 14’ long, 4 ft. wide and 3 ft deep #350. Des Arc. Call 870-256-3069.

Wooden Cricket Box $75.00, Fiberglass Duck Boat $550.00, 4 Bulb Yellow Traffic Light $200.00, 501-882-7199 after 6:00pm

Female wedding ring set. 14 KT gold, 1/2 karat tw, appraised @ $1,400. Asking $400 Cabot. Call 743-6674.

Hot Wheels and Nascar Collection. 1999 to 2005.$800 firm. Call 501-882-3566. Beebe

for sale: 8X10 steel outdoor shed: $110, 25 cubic foot refrigerator $80, Yakima car top carrier $150. Call 983-0305 or 231-0545

2400 dell Dimension computer. Includes: tower and monitor, keyboard and mouse. Microsoft Word 2002, Encarta, Money 2004. Excellent condition. $800 obo. 501-246-1999.

sony Xplode CDX M8815X auto CD player with remote $200.

NAUTILUS weight bench system with attachments and extras included, $200 obo. Queen sized bed and frame $100. 983-0025 or 987-7366.

free Voice of Music 8 track tapes. Mostly western. 501-982-3301.

MATERNITY clothes Motherhood brand. Summer to Winter. Medium to extra large. Pants, shorts, capris, long sleeves & many short sleeves. $2 & up. CD player $25. 501-626-8539.

for sale: Canning special 4 dz. clean, 1 quart jars. 870-552-7776.

approx 10 matching china tea cups/saucers - antique (occupied Japan, Germany & China). Collectors please make offer. Also have additional saucers. Call 501-882-2142 Beebe.

for sale: 4 dozen clean 1 quart jars plus odds & ends, a canning special $15. Carlisle. 870-552-7776.

LAWN EQUIPMENT AND FARM

Covered wagon for single horse setup or double horse set-up, rubber tired, canvas top, built for racing, good shape. (501)676-3998.

2 Horse trailer good shape. $650. (501)941-9263.

2 Bush hogs 1 Finish mower w/gear boxes good all need work. $180 obo 843-3937 or 941-8323.

Kubotu B6000E (12.5 HP) PTo, 3 point, excellent condition. $1,790. 843-3937 or 941-8323.

17.5 hp troy built 42 inch cut mower. New, April ‘06. Used 4 times. Moving to small yard. $900. MTD rear tine 5hp tiller. $150. 843-2870.

for sale: Riding lawnmower. PowerKraft 18.5hp, 42 inch cut. Runs and mows. $275. Beebe. 501-882-5987.

Mower blades for Cub Cadet 46 in set of 3 for series 1500 tractors w/ 46 in decks--brand new in box $20(was $40) call 501-983-1007.

riding mower yardman 13 hsp, 38” good condition, $350, push mowers: Honda 5.5 hsp self propelled $65, 5.5 hsp John Deere $55.843-5376.

Lost & Found

Lost: Chihuahua, fawn colored, 10 years old, McArthur Drive area, hot pink toenail polish, lost week of 7/27 985-4459.

ANIMALS, PETS, & SUPPLIES

20 gallon aquarium & wooden cabinet stand $150 obo. Also, includes all accessories. Excellent condition! 501-352-3699.

FREE TO GOOD HOME female cocker spaniel mix.Dog house and food included.Call between 8 a.m. and 12 noon. 870-659-5336

DWARF HAMSTERS Great for personal or classroom pet.Brown, Grey, White. $5.00 each. 501-255-0761. Cabot

HORSE FOR SALE: Paint, 2 year old gelding, Green Broke, $600 call John at 501/882-5374.

7 month old & 3 month old Billy goats for sale. $35 each. Call 501-988-0715.

pretty red Limousine & Santa Gertrudis 6 month old bull, weighs about 550 lbs, tame, for sale. $525. 501-676-2038. Call after 4 pm.

2 kittens Free to good home. 501-843-3378. Cabot.

Chickens, ducks, and guineas. All ages. 843-7651.

For Sale several horses, paints and quarters, different prices & ages. Leave message. (501) 941-1395.

horses for sale, several kinds & colors, quarter horses & paints. Different prices. 501-941-1395. Leave message if no answer.

for sale: Med. sized dog house for med. sized dog, i.e. beagle. Hard plastic w/ snap on roof. Has floor. Excellent condition. $20. 941-3922.


VEHICLES & ACCESSORIES

1992 jeep Cherokee, 4 wheel drive, good shape, cold air, $2750, 501-454-1707.

1989 MERCEDES 420SEL. Leather, power everything, sunroof. Must Sell. $3200/obo. Call Justin @ 988-9704.

2002 4-DR gray Honda Accord LX Limited Edition,gray cloth interior, extra clean ! 51,000 miles, non-smoker.$12,500 call 501-743-5443.

1990 BUICK Skylark, 4 dr, 4 cyl, cold air, good condition, $1,300 obo, call 501-982-1340/501-590-0183.

1999 NISSAN Quest GLE, silver, leather int. 6 disc CD, sun roof, alloy wls, runs great, very clean, 105k mi, $7500 obo. Call 501-606-6239

1972 Mercury comet 4 door classic needs to be restored & towed, $300. Call Jay 501-749-5105.

1990 buick Century Automatic V-6 cold-air, 160K, very dependable. $850 obo. 983-0293.

Fiberglass top for Chevy truck. $150 (501)676-3789.

1977 ford ltd runs good, asking $800. Call 501-985-9289.

1986 ford f150 LWB, excellentmechanical cond. camper shell, cold air, tow hitch. $2,850 obo. Call 501-843-8021.

1987 thunderbird 3.8 V6 runs great, power locks & windows, new tires & rims. $2,000 obo (501)838-1387 after 4 p.m. Mon-Fri.

Five 16” American Racing reins off Cadillac $400 obo. Call 501-563-3494.

71’ new rebuilt engine 454 can hear run, $1,700 obo.941-1336 or 628-4620.

overhead camper for short bed pickup, air, water, 4 burner stove, oven, porta-poddy. Excellent shape, cab over. $3,000. (501) 676-3998.

2003 White Chevrolet Silverado extended Cab CD player tinted windows, automatic seats, windows & doors. 35,000 miles. $17,500 obo. 843-7133.

1997 Chevy Cavalier Green looks good high miles no A/C priced below Blue Book. $950. Cash firm call Kathy 941-1705.

For sale: 2005 Eddie Bauer Ford Expedition excellent condition. $35,500 (501) 941-4608 after 6 p.m.

Rims (4) 17”, 5-hole, fit Chevy Cavalier. $500 obo, 501-605-3512.

Rims (Alum) “Chevy Lumina” factory with (4) like NEW Goodyear Radials, P205 70R 15, $200. 501-605-3512.

1995 ford Taurus, V-6, air, electric windows $975. 676-5838.

2 red bucket seats for Blazer. Excellet condition. $50. Call 501-743-8771. Leave message if no answer.

1986 gmc 1 Ton, flatbed, good shape $2750. 501-454-1707.

2002 Chevy s-10 xCab, LS, V6, Auto, Air, CD, after market wheels, 1-owner, 75K. $7250. 843-9538 or 1-877-843-9538.

1978 ford f100 new tires, 302 engine with 4 speed transmission. $500. 501-676-7165.

2002 Lincoln Town Car. Excellent condition, executive series, fully loaded. 52,000 miles. Call 501-843-9954

2002 Lincoln Town Car. Excellent condition, executive series, fully loaded. 52,000 miles. Call 501-843-9954.

2 ladder/lumber racks one for full size van, other for 1 ton van. $50 each obo. Ladder/Lumber rack for full size pick up $100 obo. Call 501-743-8771. Leave message if no answer.

2001 Nissan ultima Low miles. Good condition. $7,800 obo. Call 501-605-3682.

2002 chevy pk xcab Silverado, LS, Auto, PW, PL, FM/CD, 97k. $10,900. 843-9538 or 1-877-843-9538.

Nissan xterra 2004, XE Automatic. 48K Hwy miles. Excellent condition, all the extras. $16,000. 501-882-2420.

1999 Chevy Venture, V6, 3.4, White, PW, PL, Rear-air, 4DR, 74K. $5495. 843-9538 or 1-877-843-9538.

2004 Harley davidson Silver, Model # FLSTFI, Extended warranty, $2K in extras, 5,600 miles asking $15,500 obo. 501-941-4640.

1985 Silverado Chevy, LWB, Camper shell, automatic power steering, P.B. AC, 305 engine, 79,144 miles. Was $3,250.00 now $3,000. 501-982-3853.

1999 Honda Accord EX, 4 door, all power, power sunroof, CD, aluminum wheels, like new. Must see. 772-6519.

1996 Chevy s-10 Good condition, sunroof, cd player, Crager rims, $3,400 obo. 605-7346.

1989 Ford F150, LWB, 6 cylinder automatic. Rough body. $650 cash firm. 501-626-9144.

Chevrolet 1983-88 Monte Carlo SS, complete front cap $275. Good 305 engine $450, 350 transmission $300. Call 501-835-7546.

1990Chevy P/U. 6cyl, 88k mi original. Many upgrades. $5,000 OBO 501-941-4640

1990 Mazda rx-7 GXL, rare car, Power everything, needs work, Auto, $2500, 501-606-2102

2000 honda Accord LX, 51,000 miles, gray 4Dr. Sunroof-loaded. $12,500.00 Call 501-743-5443

2000 CHEVROLET Z-71, 4-wheel drive, short bed pickup, white premium wheels, dual exhaust, bedliner. $8500. 501-516-5129. 08/12
2001 chrysler Sebring LX. New brakes & tires. Remote start. Keyless entry. $7,000. Great condition. 501-288-2588.

1994 BUICK LeSabre. Gray. Runs really good. $1,000. Call after 8 pm. 843-6625.

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

2004 Sunnybrook Titan 5th wheel under warranty, 3 slides,excellent condition, like new. Call to see.843-6769.

FOR SALE Flat bottom boat 100.00, 5hp.tiller 125.00 501-676-0022.
Motorized scooter wheelchair, used only 4 months. Purchase price $5,500 will sell for $2,000 (870)552-7463, (501)680-6863

bass boat 15” blue 1969 Lunker with trailer. Evenrude motor, trolling motor fish finder. $450. 758-1494 or 944-8899 Cabot.

2006 Excel 15’ Duck boat, 40 hp Yamaha motot & trailer, Cabot (501)977-3233 or (501)584-8363.

Kawasaki Stand-up Jet Ski’s New batteries, covers, mats, grips. 550 cc- $1,995.00. Call 501-882-7199 after 6 p.m.

2001 seadoo RXX, Slow hours VERY FAST, 160 hp, very rare $6300, 501-606-2102

2004 honda Shadow 600. 2K miles, garage kept. $3,500. 580-649-8399.

For Sale Bumper pull 25 ft camper with good awning. Everything in it to camp today. Like sheets bedding dish pots silverware and coffee pot. 3000.00 and she is yours. 870-723-5222.

WANTED

LOOKING FOR a free female donkey or small horse to be a companion to my jack,he is a special animal (he was almost dead when i got him) now i hope i can breed him.please call me at 501-977- 4417 anytime.

Antique & Primitive lanterns, saws, churns, wagon wheels, single trees, hames old tools-anything old .882-5546. After 5 p.m.

wanted free or cheap cement house blocks in/around Ward area. 501-941-1395. Please leave message.

wanted non running tractor cheap. 870-255-3071 after 5pm before 9pm

would like to buy a Sony PSP w/or w/out games at good/reasonable price. 985-1163.

real estate

CABOT – 114 Pin Oak, 2750 sf, 4 BR, 3 BA, Study, Sun Room WBFP, New roof, carpet, ceramic, paint, fence, windows, pool w/new liner + safety cover. $189,500. Must sell. Open Sun 2-4. 843-3937 or 941-8323.

TRIPLE APARTMENTS for sale, in Cabot downtown. On 2 city lots. Good business opportunity or property venture. Call (501)626-9351.

CABOT-- FSBO – 38 Elk Bear Lane - 4 BR, 2 BA, 1445sf, built 2001, large fenced yard w/RV access, vaulted ceilings, fireplace, huge master bedroom w/walk-in closet. $124,000. Call 501-743-1266.*

Rentals

3 Bedroom, 1 Bath, Central Heat & Air, fenced yard. 134 Pike, Jacksonville. Rent $450, Deposit $400. 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath 109 East Boulevard, Jacksonville. Rent $350, Deposit $300. (501)259-0972.

14X70 MOBILE home for rent. Cabot 1 1/4 acres, 2 BD/2 full baths, eat in kitchen w/refrigerator & stove, large rooms, no pets. Available now. $475 a month w/deposit. 501-605-7200 for appointment

FOR RENT: Nice 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes on Large lots in Quiet Safe Park close to LRAFB. New Carpet and Appliances. Starting at $350 per month plus Deposit Call 501-835-3450.

in beebe: very nice 2BD/2BA apartments. All utilities paid including basic cable. Washer & Dryer furnished. $675 month. Twin Lakes Apartments. Call Lisa 278-0498 or 882-2882.

Sunnyside Houses: Rent to Own. All C/H&A, all 2 Bedroom, all $200 deposit. 198 Roosevelt Road, $380. 120 Union, $400. 161 Roosevelt, $350. $132 Pike, $375. 120 Roosevelt Circle, $375. 123 Roosevelt Circle, $375. Jacksonville (501) 563-4886 or (501) 398-0528.

FOR LEASE 6500 SF commercial building on West Main in Cabot. Available September 2006. Call Mrs. Taylor. 501-843-8438.

14 X 70 MOBILE For rent Cabot. 1 1/4 acres 2 BD/ 2 full baths eat in kitchen w/refrigerator & stove. Large rooms, no pets. Available now $475 a month w/deposit. 501-605-7200 for appointment.

For Rent in beebe: nice 2 Bedroom Brick Home. Central Heat & Air. 1 year lease required. No Pets. $450 per month. Call (501) 882-9362.*

Cabot schools very clean, 2 and 3 bedroom Manuf. homes on site managers, country setting, blocks away from elementary school. No pets, rent start at $375 mo. Call 501-843-0709 or 501-982-9351

2 bedroom 2 Bath Mobile Home. All electric central heat & air. Tree shaded. Good neighborhood. 2 minutes from interstate. Fenced on 3 sides. $375 rent & $375 security. NO PETS. 501-988-5187. Ask for Ed.

cabot schools 3 Bedroom 1 1/2 bath with bonus room, large fenced backyard, fresh paint, new carpet & flooring. $750 deposit, $800 month. Call 501-416-3959 for more information.

Lots & Acreage

1 2 1/2 Acre lots with all in ground utilities. For houses only, restricted. 6 miles from Cabot in Sylvania Community-Cabot Schools. Private road, county appraised off 321 on Allison Road. Clay Hidden Estates. 22,000-35,000. Call (501)626-9351, (501)454-0244.*

4.42 Acres with all utilities. Nice area. 4608 Old Tom Box Road (off Maddox) 501-988-1807.

Commercial Property

House for rent: Could be used for commercial office. Three bedrooms, 2 bath, and a bonus room. 1322 West Locus in Cabot. Call Jerry or Cary 1-877-729-2438.

Jacksonville: Corner lot. Approx. 11,770 square ft, 1 block off main street w/ 2 existing buildings. For more information call.501-425-2008.*

LEGAL NOTICE

Legal notice as published in the August 12, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF LONOKE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
SECOND DIVISION
VIOLA B. RICHARD LIVING TRUST PETITIONER VS. NO. CV 2006-336
PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4)
OF THE SOUTHWEST (SW/4) OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 04 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST OF THE FIFTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, LONOKE COUNTY,
ARKANSAS, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4) OF SAID SECTION 15; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, 348.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 358.32 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 118.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST, 252.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, 460.53 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST, 559.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. RESPONDENT
NOTICE OF QUIET TITLE
Notice is hereby given that a Petition has been filed in the office of the Circuit Clerk of Lonoke County, Arkansas to quiet and confirm the title in and to the following described property located in Lonoke County, Arkansas:
PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST (SW/4) OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 04 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST OF THE FIFTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, LONOKE COUNTY, ARKANSAS, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW/4) OF SAID SECTION 15; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, 348.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 358.32 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 118.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST, 252.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, 460.53 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 02 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST, 559.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming any title or interest of any kind to said property is hereby notified to appear herein on or before thirty days from the date of this first Notice filed herein to assert his title or interest in said property and to demonstrate why titled to this property should not be quieted and confirmed in the Plaintiffs herein.
Witness my hand this 20th day of July 2006.
Deborah Oglesby CIRCUIT CLERK


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-226
BRIAN TANNER DEFENDANT
WARNING ORDER
TO: BRIAN TANNER,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy
Court Clerk Lee Gentry, Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-227
PAMELA YOUNG AND/OR ALVIN MOODY DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
TO: PAMELA YOUNG AND/OR ALVIN MOODY,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy Court Clerk
Lee Gentry,
Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B
Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-249
TOM FRASIER, DEFENDANT
WARNING ORDER
TO: TOM FRASIER,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy Court Clerk
Lee Gentry,
Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B
Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-250
PAMELA YOUNG AND/OR ALVIN MOODY,
DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
TO: PAMELA YOUNG AND/OR ALVIN MOODY,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy Court Clerk
Lee Gentry,
Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B
Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-251
TINA MEREKO DEFENDANT
WARNING ORDER
TO: TINA MEREKO,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy Court Clerk Lee Gentry,
Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B
Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry


LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-253
MICHAEL McWILLIAMS AND/OR DAVID McGUIRE
DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
TO: MICHAEL McWILLIAMS AND/OR DAVID McGUIRE,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You are notified that you must appear and defend by filing your answer to the complaint within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this warning order, and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default may be entered against you for relief demanded in the complaint as circumscribed by the laws of this State.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as Clerk of the court, this 7th day of August, 2006
Vanessa Washington, Deputy Court Clerk
Lee Gentry,
Agent for Plaintiff
8122 John F. Kennedy Bl. #B
Sherwood, AR 72120
(501) 834-8222
Original signed by Lee Gentry
LEGAL NOTICE
Legal notice as published in the August 12 & 16, 2006 edition of The Leader.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SHERWOOD, ARKANSAS
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLAINTIFF VS CASE # 2006-254
CARL THOMAS AND/OR DAVID McGUIRE,
DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
TO: CARL THOMAS AND/OR DAVID McGUIRE,
You are notified that E-Z Check Cashing, whose agent’s address is listed below has filed a complaint against you. A copy of the complaint and summons shall be delivered to you or your attorney upon request. You

SPORTS >> Lonoke achieves breakthrough

IN SHORT: Despite a pair of injuries, the Jackrabbits have made big strides in week two.

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

The second week of practice for Lonoke was a productive one. The coaching staff spent much of the Thursday and Friday practices going over offensive and defensive strategies and the proper way to line up.

The defensive units also spent a lot of time working on snap counts, learning to move with the ball instead of on the count.

Thursday’s practice produced a couple of scares for the Jackrabbits. Starting tailback Duane Hood injured his knee on a running play, and senior re-ceiver Kylon Boyd suffered an injury to a finger attempting a catch.

Hood’s injury was not deemed anything major, but Boyd was headed to the doctor Thursday afternoon to see if there were any torn tendons in his wounded digit. Lonoke head coach Jeff Jones doesn’t think the injury will be that big of a setback.

“We can’t do anything with Kylon right now but speculate,” Jones said. “Duane’s injury is just something that has been hampering him some, so we let him sit out the last part of today. Hopefully it is something that he can overcome pretty quick.”

Jones said the practices have been solid throughout the week, with the exception of Tuesday.

“They’ve held up well,” Jones said. “We kind of hit the wall on Tuesday, but they’ve come back the last two days. We’ve had some quality practices the last two days, so I feel like we have busted through that wall.”

As the start of the season quickly approaches, Jones still stresses the importance of taking things one day at a time. He says he continues to see new progress made every day, but still sees the potential for much more improvement.

“I feel like they are getting better every day,” Jones said. “We have made a lot of progress, but we still have a long ways to go. I don’t think that by the day before our scrimmage, we will be exactly where we want to be or even after the scrimmage.

“We just want to go out there and make gains every day and continue to im-prove every time we go out on the field, whether it’s a game or a practice. That’s what coaching and the game of football is all about.”

The Jackrabbits will continue to work on lining up, and any adjustments that need to be made at the line. Jones says the lineup is ironed out for the most part, but a lot of cleaning up and improvement on execution is needed.

“We’re trying to do some adjusting and aligning to our defense. The most important thing in a good defense is not to get beat at the line, so we want to make sure we are as solid as we can be in that department. We’re just trying to leave no stone unturned right now.”

SPORTS >> Devil QB recovered, ready

IN SHORT: Jacksonville’s Daniel Hubbard says he’s fully recovered from the broken leg he suffered late last season.

By RAY BENTON
Leader sports editor

Jacksonville spent very little time during the first week of two-a-days practicing in full pads. That changed this week, but the excitement on the field apparently has not.

Of all the returning starters at the skill positions, none have been more eagerly and anxiously awaited as quarterback Daniel Hubbard. Hubbard suffered a broken leg in the Red Devils’ playoff loss to state champion Springdale last year, and has slowly recovered over the course of the past several months.

He has peformed well during summer seven-on-seven meets, and says he’s now fully recovered.

“The leg’s great, I’m at 100 percent now,” Hubbard said. “I think I got there about midway through the summer. I hardly think about it now.”

Hubbard is still being protected during full-contact practices. He’s wearing the green jersey that says to defensive players, ‘do not hit’.

Hubbard says his teammates have stayed energetic during two-a-days, but admits that the heat does get burdensome.
“It’s hot,” Hubbard said. “We’ve stuck it out. We’re doing a pretty good job staying after it, but it’s been really hot, and that can get to you. It’ll pay off in our conditioning though. It should help us late in games.”

Hubbard, who has started since the second game of his sophomore year, sees a difference in this preseason practice, compared to the last two. The most glaring difference is the advanced state at which the offense started practice.

“The last two years the defense has been way ahead of the offense when we started,” Hubbard said. “This year I think the offense is ahead. We’ve executed really well. The receivers are catching the ball really well, and of course we’ve got awesome running backs.”

There’s one other difference Hubbard has noticed with this group.

“Everybody gets along real good. There are no attitudes.”

At receiver, Hubbard will have a couple of new, and big, targets.

Seniors Marcus King and Norvel Gabriel will split wide this season. King has been a wideout since his sophomore year, but hasn’t been an every-down player. That is going to change when Sept. 1 rolls around.

“Marcus King has always had all the physical tools to be awesome,” Hubbard said. “Now he’s catching the ball really well and he’s going to be huge for us. He’s tall and real fast.”

Gabriel, 6-foot-4, played mostly defensive end last year, and played a few snaps at tight end. Hubbard doesn’t see the transition as much of a problem.

“Norvel Gabriel is huge. He’s an easy target and he catches it real well too.”

Senior Blake Mattison and junior Tirrell L’Hrisse are returning as consistent and dependable targets from last year.

Hubbard also recognizes Jacksonville’s uncertainty on the interior, but expects that area to come around and be solid.
“We’re going to be small, but quick on the line,” Hubbard said. “I think they’ll come on and be really good. I’m not too worried about it.”

SPORTS >> Sophomores standing out for Panthers

IN SHORT: Cabot’s 10th-grade class has stepped up this summer to fill holes left by small junior and senior classes.

By RAY BENTON
Leader sports editor

The Cabot Panther preseason two-a-days have had no shortage of bright spots, but the brightest is that of the sophomore class. Though not all will start, several 10th graders have stepped up and will fill important roles for the Panthers this season.

As of this week, the 36 sophomores outnumber the senior and junior classes combined. There were 15 seniors and 16 juniors still going through workouts this week.

“It’s been a pretty hard-working group overall, especially the sophomores,” Cabot coach Mike Malham said. “We go more than most other teams do, and there’s still 36 left out of 41 that started two-a-days with us. I don’t know how many teams even do two-a-days anymore, and most of them only do it one week. We’re in our second week plus Saturday mornings. And we’re going to go twice a day through next Wednesday too. This group has made it through that with fewer dropping out than recently. So that’s good. I think this group is going to stick with it.”

Senior Colin Fuller has moved to halfback for most of the repetitions, but still takes some of the snaps at fullback. His move was made possible by a strong surge from sophomore Sheridan transfer Vince Aguilar. Aguilar, 5-foot-8, 200 pounds, taking over at fullback takes some load off Fuller, who will also start at safety on defense.

“If he (Aguilar) keeps coming along, and I think he will, he’s going to help out a lot,” Malham said. “He’s a big kid that can run a little bit, and he’s tough to bring down.”

Two sophomores are looking like starters, or at least prominent backups, on the defensive line. Blake Carter, 201 pounds, and Kyle DeBlock, 196, have performed well and will see playing time.

Hunter Hess, who was the fullback for CJHN’s undefeated team a year ago, will help out in the secondary. Matt Jackson, 283, is one of several offensive linemen with good size in the sophomore class that Malham believes will play this year. The head Panther is especially excited about the future potential of such a large and athletic group.

“You get those big guys up front that can move a little bit and that helps you out,” Malham said.

SPORTS >> Local family races for fun and future

IN SHORT: Bryan, Kip and Nick Glaze all race in different series around the country. Bryan’s venture in the Hooters Pro-Cup series is a stepping stone for Nick’s racing future.

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

The Glaze family of Austin is building a family tradition in racing, although in many different forms of racing. Brothers Kip, 38, and Bryan, 34, started out racing on dirt in hobbies and modifieds.

Bryan has made the recent move to the Hooters Pro-Cup Southern Series, racing asphalt shows in one of the country’s premier stock-car racing series.

Kip has raced several seasons in the IMCA modifieds around central Arkansas after racing late models in the Georgia and Florida area in the late 90’s up until 2002.

Add Kip’s son, 14-year-old Nick into the mix, and you have three drivers all in the same stable. Nick has spent this season racing primarily in Batesville in the economy-modified division weekly series.

The long-term plan is for Nick to get asphalt experience before he eventually makes his way into the Hooters series. For Bryan, it is a chance to help his nephew gain experience, while carrying out a life-long dream of his own.

“This is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Bryan said. “We’re gaining knowledge that Nick can use later on. I don’t know my future in the series, or in the sport in general for that matter.”

Bryan’s first attempt at Hooters racing came last year at Peach State Speedway in Georgia. A practice wreck prevented him from running the race, but he is hoping that a year of learning the car will help him when he returns to the speedway this weekend.

The race after Peach State is the one that Bryan is really anticipating. The Glaze Motorsports team will travel to the famed Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee for a Pro-Cup race the same weekend that the stars of the Nextel Cup series will take to the famed high-bank, one-half mile oval.

“That will be our biggest race of the year by far,” Bryan said. “All of the cup guys will be there, and we will be racing the same day as the Craftsman Truck Series.”

Although he says his racing season is over, Kip is probably the busiest of the trio. Along with helping out son Nick with his e-mod racing, he also serves as a spotter for Bryan on the Hooters side.

The spotter acts as a second set of eyes for a driver in many asphalt divisions. With all of the safety devices that are required around the head and neck, drivers have a hard time seeing what is around them. The spotter communicates a driver’s position via radio, telling him if there are cars alongside him on the outside or inside.

Racing is not the only game in town for the Glaze family. Through their successful family business, Five-Star Airbags in Cabot, they have found a lucrative way to finance their racing endeavors as a hobby, and a potential professional career for Nick.

“I’m too old to make a career out of this,” Kip said. “Nick is still young enough that he can still do it, so I’m going to give him every opportunity that I can.”

It has not been all fun and games for the Glaze family this year. Kip and Nick are just one month out of a tragic accident on their way back from Batesville that not only destroyed a car, it also claimed the life of Nick’s mother. Kip was injured in the accident as well, but says that help from friends and fellow racers have made a big difference.

“I didn’t realize how good of friends we had,” Kip said. “I knew we had a lot of friends, but I didn’t know just how good. The best therapy has been getting Nick back into a car, it helps to keep my mind off of it and has kind of helped to get things back to normal.”

Nick has had a good rookie season in the e-mod division. He has held his own with modified standouts like Jason Wilkey and Jerry Waugh all season, and holds ninth in the season standings despite missing a couple of races. The biggest moment in his career so far came last year in the Beebe mini-stocks, where he won a feature race in just his eighth start. He was technically not eligible to race at the time due to his age, but says what the old track management didn’t know won’t hurt them.

“They can’t get their money back now,” Nick said. “Or the trophy either for that matter. It was an adrenaline rush to win that race, it gave me some bragging rights.”

The tentative plan for next year is for Bryan to continue in the Hooters series while Kip and Nick get asphalt experience in late models and modifieds at Nashville and Birmingham before Nick makes the eventual move to the Hooters series.

EDITORIALS>> ‘Good,’ ‘bad’ governors

Economic statistics can prove to be so perverse, but rarely to such an extreme as the report card that the Arkansas Policy Foundation issued the past week on the job-creating performance of Arkansas governors since World War II.

The Policy Foundation is the conservative, Republican-leaning think tank in Little Rock that promotes lower taxes, smaller government, private-school vouchers and reduced spending on public education. It maintains that business and job growth depend heavily on a good business climate of light regulation and low or nonexistent taxes on business and incomes. So it examined labor statistics both for Arkansas and the nation since the war to see how the governors stacked up.

If the figures that it gleaned were a valid measure of the governors’ economic performances, you would have to draw a couple of conclusions: (1) Republican governors are antibusiness and antigrowth, Democratic governors far better, and (2) governors who preside over tax increases tend to rack up more new jobs for people than those who don’t.

No one would seriously argue either of those assertions, and certainly not the Arkansas Policy Foundation. But what are we to make of the statistics?

- The worst jobs record of all the governors since World War II? Hands down, it belongs to Mike Huckabee. He is the only one of the 10 governors whose tenure produced a percentage growth in net non-farm jobs that was lower than the national growth for the same period. Next to worst would be Gov. Frank White, the last previous Republican, in 1981-83, who was the only governor during whose term the state actually experienced a net loss of jobs. But the country fell into a deep recession halfway through White’s single term and the nation as a whole lost jobs at a slightly quicker pace than Arkansas. Winthrop Rockefeller, the other Republican, ranked in the bottom half.

- The best governors for jobs growth? In order, they were David Pryor (1975-79), Dale Bumpers (1971-75), Orval E. Faubus (1955-67) and Sid McMath (1949-53). The job-growth rate ranged from 5.4 percent under Pryor to 4.8 percent under McMath. No one was close to those four. You wondered about Bill Clinton? He was low (1.7 percent) in his first term (1979-81) but moderately effective (3.8 percent) his second tenure (1983-92).

What lessons have we learned from the Policy Foundation’s intriguing report? The foundation seems not to have offered any itself. The best lesson may be that there is no lesson of abiding consequence. Arkansas is not an economy unto itself but, as Mike Huckabee’s 10-year record demonstrates, it is carried along in the eddies of national economic flow and ebb. The policies and successes of individual governors work at the margins of the economy.

But the little think tank that brought us the titillating statistics might absorb one lesson from its labors: what the figures do not prove, that raising taxes for education, highways and health care is the death knell of expansion and jobs. Those governors with the superb record of new jobs? They raised taxes significantly, all except Pryor, whose two terms were a virtual extension of the Bumpers administration, when every major tax was expanded in some way.

On the other hand, as the Policy Foundation would surely point out, taxes and government have grown mightily under Mike Huckabee and jobs have disappeared or cropped up sparsely. We’ll make the governor’s apologia for him: He did well during the Clinton boom years of 1996-2000, and the lucky Bumpers, Pryor and McMath did not have to stand in the wake when the economic tide went out with George W. Bush.

OBITUARIES >> 08-12-06

Shirley Hopkins
Shirley Ann Petty Hopkins, 67, of Stuttgart passed away Aug. 5.

She was born March 5, 1939, in Little Rock, to the late Julius and Myrtle Petty.

Survivors include her sons, Ray Harrison and wife, Becky of Little Rock, Lynn Berry and wife, Sherry of Austin; one daughter, Susan Deely of Stuttgart; two brothers, Dr. Gene Petty of Longview, Texas, and Dr. Charles Petty of Raleigh, N.C.; one stepsister, Lois Lovette of Stuttgart, and seven grandchildren.

A memorial service was held Aug. 7 at First Baptist Church in England. Funeral arrangements were by Thomas Funeral Service.


Robert Morrison
Robert Dwayne Morrison, 44, of Cabot, died Aug. 3.

He was the son of Robert Lee Morrison and Elender Ashmore Morrison.

He attended the Apostolic Church in North Little Rock. He was preceded in death by his father.

Survivors include one son, Robbie Morrison; one daughter, Sarah Morrison; one sister, Tamera Mor-rison, and his mother, all of Cabot.

Funeral services were held Aug. 7 at Griffin Leggett Rest Hills Fu-neral Home in North Little Rock.

Burial was in Rest Hills Memorial Park.


Jessie Scott
Jessie A. Scott, 77, of Jacksonville, died Aug. 7 at her home. She was born Oct. 19, 1928 in Washington, D.C. to the late Wallace E. and Elsie Schenck Miller.

She was also preceded in death by her husband, Norman Russell Scott; a son, Steven M. Scott, and two sisters, Murle Miller-Casey and Elsie Buddington.

Jessie was a member of First United Methodist Church in Jacksonville. She was a member of Seekers Sunday School Class and First United Methodist Church Young At Heart. She was a member of Rebsamen Medical Auxiliary, a lifetime member of AFSAA and volunteered at the Little Rock Air Force Base Pharmacy. She was a Leader employee.

Survivors include a daughter, Aileen Holt of Colorado Springs, Colo.; a son, Russell Scott and his wife, Angela of Jacksonville; five grandchildren, Chris Scott of Little Rock, Jessica Holt of Tampa, Fla., Kimberly Chrissonberry of Conway, Leslie Hallahan of California, Steven Holt of Colorado Springs and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Aug. 10 at the First United Methodist Church in Jacksonville with Rev. Charles Watts officiating.
Interment followed at The National Veteran’s Cemetery in  Little Rock.

Visitation was held Aug. 9 at Moore’s Jacksonville Funeral Home.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the First United Methodist Church in Jacksonville or to the American Red Cross.

 
Charles Schmitt
Charles Edward Schmitt, 49, of Jacksonville, passed away Aug. 6.

He was born April, 8, 1957, in Little Rock, the son of Heles McDaniel Stoneking of Jackson-ville and the late Waymon Schmitt.

Survivors include two brothers, Orville Mccoy, Sr., and Jackie Larell McCoy, Jr., both of Jacksonville; two sisters, Barbara Moon of Maumelle and Brenda Mitchell of Fort Smith; one aunt, Alice Thompson of Jacksonville; three cousins; a host of nieces and nephews and many friends.

Funeral services were held Aug. 9 at Griffin Leggett Rest Hills Chapel in North Little Rock.

TOP STORY >> Annexation appealed by Jacksonville

IN SHORT: The city will take the county judge’s ruling to circuit court to stop 2,000 acres from going into Sherwood.

By RICK KRON
Leader staff writer

Jacksonville will appeal the county judge’s recent decision to let four landowners annex their 2,000 acres into Sherwood.

Jacksonville had already opposed the voluntary annexation request by the owners, and Pulaski County Judge Buddy Villines ordered a hearing on the matter in June. At the hearing, he request that both Sherwood and Jacksonville submit their legal arguments by July 15.

Last week, the judge ruled that the annexation request met all the state and local requirements and could proceed. According to Mike Clayton, Sherwood’s city engineer, there are two ways to annex into a city, through voluntary or involuntary means.

Four developers—Greg Heslep, Byron McKimmey, Metropolitan Realty and Lilac LLC—volunteered to come into Sherwood. For the city to accept a voluntary petition, it must be signed by at least 51 percent of the landowners, controlling at least 51 percent of the land.

In this case, the voluntary petition was signed by 100 percent of the landowners, controlling 100 percent of the land.

Villines said in his order that Sherwood could only refuse the annexation if it were “unable to provide services to the annexed area.”

“Don’t worry,” Sherwood Mayor Bill Harmon said, “we’ll provide service.”

Jacksonville Mayor Tommy Swaim said the city would appeal the ruling within the required 30 days. An appeal would be heard in circuit court.

In its earlier objections, Jacksonville said the land was better served as part of Jacksonville, that the city had utilities already in that area.

Jacksonville City Attorney Bob Bamburg also argued that the Little Rock Air Force Base’s aircraft safety flight zone extended into part of the are proposed for annexation and that Jacksonville had ordinances protecting that area from excessive development as requested by the Air Force.

The city also argued that the annexation would create an island of residential housing around Hatcher Road that would remain in the county because it was not included in the voluntary annexation.

Mayor Swaim said those factors would be brought up again in the appeal. “At this time I don’t know if we’ll add any other points,” he said.

The appeal won’t necessarily stop one of the landowners who filed plans with Sherwood to build a light commercial development on part of his property. The owner, Heslep, according to city engineer, was going to file for approval with the county too, which still has jurisdiction over the land.

The 2,000 acres of undeveloped land stretches north off Sherwood and west of Jack-sonville, touching the edge of the Little Rock Air Force Base.

When the four property owners filed for voluntary annexation, Jacksonville opposed the idea and appealed to the county judge who had to release the land from the county, so it could become part of Sherwood.

In his recent order, Villines said. “The Court is not persuaded that extraterritorial planning jurisdiction precludes annexation.
The judge further ruled, “The creation of an island is not grounds to void an annexation.”

He also said in his order that the court “does not believe its discretion extends to determining which municipality is better able to adapt the property to municipal use…the Petition for Annexation is granted.”

Back in June, the Jacksonville City Council unanimously passed a resolution in opposition to the annexation, stating that the proposed annexation was “neither productive nor beneficial.”

The city’s planning commission joined in at its June meeting and voted to support the council’s resolution.

The city also expressed fear that a development spurt in the proposed annexed area could put the base in jeopardy of closing.

“We would never allow anything that would jeopardize the base, “ said Clayton.

Sherwood Mayor Bill Harmon was ecstatic about the judge’s decision and said, “We wouldn’t be surprised if all of Arkansas wanted to come to Sherwood.”

TOP STORY >> Vehicle shootout leaves a Cabot teen dead

IN SHORT: A possible sale of marijuana ended in one man being wounded and one murder Wednesday night.

By PEG KENYON
Leader staff writer

A shootout in a vehicle on the west parking lot at Jacksonville High School left a Cabot teen murdered and a Jacksonville man wounded Wednesday night.

Preliminary evidence leads police to believe it was a drug deal gone bad. “A large amount of marijuana was found at the scene,” said Lt. Martin Cass, assistant public information officer for Jacksonville Police Department.

Initially, police took two suspects into custody following the fatal shooting of Justin Davis, 18. Robert Cody Hall, 18, and Bret Michael Deangelis, 19, both of Cabot have been charged with one felony count each of capital murder, first-degree battery, aggravated robbery and conspiracy to possess a controlled substance. Neither had a bond initially listed.

“They were shooting at each other,” Cass said.

Deangelis allegedly admitted to being involved in a drug deal. He said the four of them met up at the high school along Linda Lane.

Four men were in a vehicle as the shootout began, Cass believes.

Three fled from the vehicle. Davis slid into the driver’s seat of a vehicle, al-though someone else had been originally behind the wheel, according to Cass.

“He then crashed into a retaining wall at the Linda Lane Apartments,” Cass said. “He got 100 to 150 yards away.”

At about 9:30 p.m., calls into the 911 Communications Center led local po-lice officers to the seriously wounded Cabot teen at the Linda Lane Apart-ment complex.

Davis was shot once in the chest and transported arrival, a white male was found lying on the ground with a possible gunshot wound.

A second victim who apparently had gunshot wounds to a hand and a knee went to Rebsamen Medical Center in Jacksonville. He was treated and later released, police said. The second victim was identified as 20-year-old Corzellis Neeley.

According to Cass, Neeley left the scene in another vehicle driven by a woman.

After going to a relative’s residence, Neeley ended up at the local hospital just before the ambulance arrived there with the mortally wounded Davis, Cass says. Deangelis alleges that there was a plan to rob Neeley who had brought the marijuana to sell to them. According to the police report, this resulted in a struggle between Davis and Neeley. Police recovered two 9-mm handguns from the vehicle.

This homicide marks Jacksonville’s third for the year.

TOP STORY >> Officials still battling over surplus

IN SHORT: Legislators debate what to do with the state’s $402.7 million surplus when the 86th General Assembly convenes in January.

By RICK KRON
Leader staff writer

Rep. Will Bond, D-Jacksonville says giving taxpayers a rebate check with the state’s $402.7 million surplus isn’t going to help the state’s residents as much as tax reform would.

“I think it would be smarter to have tax reform to reduce tax burden not just have a one time check ranging $30 to a couple of hundred dollars,” Bond told The Leader.

Arkansas ended the previous fiscal year June 30 with a $402.7 million surplus, the largest in the state’s history. Revenue officials have projected a $234.5 million surplus for the end of this fiscal year. That, plus surplus money left over from state budgets, would give Arkansas a projected surplus of roughly $721 million.

“There’s different type of reforms to look at such as elimination of grocery tax to reduce the burden on citizens,” Bond said.
Above all, Bond doesn’t want to see taxes go up. “My number one goal for the rest of my career as a legislator is to not raise taxes,” Bond said.

Bond agrees with putting some of the money aside into a rainy day fund for the state as well as funding building improvements for the state’s ailing and aging schools.

Since learning of the state’s surplus earlier this year. Gov. Mike Huckabee has been pushing for a tax refund for residents. “We’ve got to move very, very cautiously,” said state Sen. Bobby Glover, D-Carlisle. “I think we need to leave it up to the next governor and legislature.”

Glover said that he was not in favor of a rebate.” Once we give it back or do anything with it, it’ll be gone. We need to act appropriately so we don’t have to raise taxes in the future.” The senator added he was not going to vote for any type of a tax increase in the foreseeable future.

Glover said that if the surplus continues to grow, he would like to see the state phase out the tax on groceries. “That’s better than a rebate,” he said. “Any rebate amount we give back would be small per individual, but would cost the state a large sum.”

Glover said some of the surplus needs to be put into a rainy day fund, and he expects some will have to be used to fill the funding requirements for education and prison reforms and needs. “We also have to fill in what the federal government has pulled out of its Medicare funding.”

District 15 Rep. Lenville Evans, D-Lonoke, says he’s undecided and will probably stay that way until after state budget meetings in September and October. “We really won’t know how much of a surplus we truly have until we get the education and Medicare issues settled,” Evans said.

He added that every state department would now be asking for more money.

And to prove his point, Arkansas colleges and schools recently asked for an additional $239 million for their budget and another $318 million in capitol improvement projects. “Wanting is one thing, getting is another,” Evans said.

District 43 Rep. Jeff Wood, D-Sherwood, said he agrees with most of the other legislators about holding on to some of the surplus.

“Consensus is that we need a rainy day fund,” Wood said. He recalled a special session a few years ago where the legislature had to come up with about $120 million or cut state services. “It was not fun to be in that position,” Wood said, “and I don’t won’t us to go through that again in the future.”

Wood said there would need to be very specific regulations governing the rainy day fund. “After establish that fund, I’d like to see us put more into education, then I’d take a wait and see position on remaining funds,” Wood said.

District 14 Rep. Benny Petrus, D-Stuttgart, the incoming House Speaker, recently told Lonoke leaders that the legislature would take a slow, studious and sensible approach to the surplus.

TOP STORY >> Beebe only district to meet U.S. standards

IN SHORT: Several schools are cited for not keeping with federal No Child Left Behind Act.

By SARA GREENE
Leader staff writer

Beebe is the only school district locally that was not on the state’s school improvement list of 325 schools that aren’t keeping up with the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

“I think most of those schools on the list are doing a lot of things right. I think it will be difficult for schools to not be on the list at one time or another because of the way the schools are measured,” said Belinda Shook, superintendent of Beebe.

Of the schools on the list, 14 are in the local area, including one, for the first time, in Cabot.

A school can be placed on the list or remain on the list if it doesn’t, as a whole or its various subgroups don’t make adequate yearly progress (AYP) on the state benchmark or end-of-course exams.

All students are supposed to be scoring proficient or advanced on the exams by the end of the 2013-2014 school year.

Schools in the local area placed on the recently released school improvement list include Lonoke Elementary, England High School, Jacksonville Elementary and Cabot Middle School North — all on Year One status.

Jacksonville Middle School and Sylvan High School are in Year Two status, while Lonoke Middle School, England Middle School, Jacksonville High School, North Pulaski High School, Northwood Middle School and Murrell Taylor are in Year Three status.

Sylvan Hills Middle School is in Year Four status.

The following actions occur, ac-cording to the state Education Department, with each successive year of not meeting adequate yearly progress.

School Improvement Year 1: School must provide choice option for students to attend another school in the district not in im-provement.

School may, at the option of the school/district, offer supplemental services if choice is not an option;

School Improvement Year 2: School must continue to provide choice and add the option of supplemental services to students who qualify;

School Improvement Year 3: District is required to establish and implement a plan of corrective action;

School Improvement Year 4: District is required to plan to restructure the identified school;

School Improvement Year 5: District is required to implement restructuring of school;

School Improvement Year 6: District/school must continue with restructuring efforts.

About 50 more schools are in some phase of school improvement this year than last year.

Much of that is due to the fact that grades three, five and seven were added to the calculations this yea, according to the Arkansas Department of Education.

In doing that, schools became more likely to have subgroups with 40 or more students in them.

Subgroups of students with 40 or more from across all grades within a school must also meet AYP in both literacy and math; if a single subgroup does not meet the annual yearly progress goals in either subject, the entire school is placed in school improvement.

Subgroups that could put a school on the improvement list include economically disadvantaged students, students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, African-Ame-rican students, Caucasian students and Hispanic students.

Cabot Middle School North made the list because its students with disabilities didn’t score well enough in math or literacy.

“We are looking at what we can do to help the special education students meet the math and literacy requirements not just at Middle School North but throughout the district,” said Frank Holman, superintendent of the Cabot School District.

“I think Ms. Calhoun and her staff are doing some great things in helping special education students progress,” Holman said.

Jacksonville Elementary was added to the list because its economically disadvantaged students didn’t make enough progress in math.

The state did not list specific reasons for adding Lonoke Ele-mentary or England High School to the list.

Jacksonville Middle School stayed on the list because its combined population, as well as African American and economically disadvantaged students, did not make adequate progress in math.

Sylvan Hills High School stayed on the list because its African American students failed to do well in math or literacy, and its economically disadvantaged students also didn’t do well in math.

Lonoke Middle School re-mained on the list because its African-American and economically disadvantaged students, as well as those with disabilities, didn’t make progress in math.

Students with disabilities also failed to make progress in literacy.

England Middle School stayed on the list because its combined population, African-American students and economically disadvantages students failed to do well enough in literacy.

The school’s African-American and economically disadvantaged students also failed to progress in math.

Jacksonville High School moved to Year 3 status because its combined population failed to make adequate progress in math or literacy.

Also its African-American and economically disadvantaged students did not do well in math or literacy.

At North Pulaski High School, its African-American students didn’t make enough progress in math or literacy.

Northwood Middle School remained on the list because its economically disadvantaged students didn’t do well in math and students with disabilities failed to make enough progress in math or literacy.

While at Murrell Taylor Ele-mentary, the combined population failed to make the grade in literacy. Sylvan Hills Middle School’s students with disabilities failed to make progress in math or literacy.

Sylvan Hills Middle School’s economically disadvantaged students didn’t make the cut in math.

“The end goal of No Child Left Behind and, more specifically, of determining schools that are not meeting adequate yearly progress, is a good one – making all schools accountable for the academic success of each and every student,” said Ken James, ADE commis-sioner.

“By identifying schools that don’t make AYP (adequate yearly progress),” James said, “We are able to help them identify areas that need strengthening through professional development or through spending additional time engaging students in the learning process. It’s really meant to be a corrective and not a punitive system.”

To that end, this year the state Department of Education is implementing America’s Choice, a “turn-around” model for schools that last year were as identified as being in years three, four or five of school improvement.

America’s Choice is a research-based set of strategies shown to improve the overall academic success in low performing schools.

The program will be initiated at Sylvan Hills Middle School this school year.

Across the state, schools that did not achieve adequate yearly progress this year as mandated included:

- 96 school that are in year one of school improvement

- 37 that are in year two of school improvement

- 90 that are in year three of school improvement

- 30 that are in year four of school improvement

- Three are in year five of school improvement

- One is in year six of school improvement

- 68 schools that have been in school improvement achieved adequate yearly progress this past school year, but need two
consecutive years of improvement to be taken off the list.

Schools have 30 days to appeal their status in regard to AYP.

Many times, according to James, these appeals are made because of coding errors that place students in the wrong subgroup.

These appeals do sometimes change a school’s status, and the Arkansas Department of Edu-cation will release a revised list once all of the appeals have been processed.

The list of schools in School Improvement is available under “What’s New” on the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) Web site, http://ArkansasEd.org.

Arkansas has just over 1,100 public schools serving students in grades kindergarten through 12.

Thursday, August 10, 2006

TOP STORY >> Fire takes Cabot school

IN SHORT: Suspected electrical fire destroys one of Cabot’s junior highs as district officials plan to use portable buildings for classes.

By SARA GREENE AND JOAN MCCOY
Leader staff writer

Parents were registering their children for classes Thursday afternoon when they realized Cabot Junior High School North was on fire.

Dozens of teachers, parents and youngsters hurried out of the building as flames engulfed the structure, which was destroyed despite efforts by firefighters who worked seven hours to contain the blaze.

By 9 p.m., the inner walls had collapsed and most of the roof and Cabot firefighters knew they would have to keep a close watch over it for at least two more days to make sure it didn’t flare up again.

Smoke could be seen from as far away as Jacksonville as a suspected electrical fire destroyed the 115,400-square-foot school.

The State Police will investigate the blaze.

The one-story building at 38 Spirit Drive across the street from the football fieldparking lot was eight years old.

The fire broke out in a closet in the library just after 2 p.m. Students in grades seven through nine had been in the building throughout the day for registration.

“Our administrators got everyone out like they’re supposed to. No one got hurt,” said Frank Holman, superintendent of the Cabot School District. “We’re going to get it put out and assess the damage,” Holman said.

Local restaurants brought food and businesses and citizens brought bottled water for fire crews that responded from Cabot, Jacksonville, North Pulaski Fire Rescue, Beebe, Ward and Austin as they battled the blaze in 100-degree heat and gusty winds.

Firefighters had to don safety masks to fight the blaze as they neared the school’s science lab. Two firefighters overheated while they were battling the blaze and were taken by ambulance to the hospital.

Cabot School Board member Brooks Nash, who was principal at Junior High South when Junior High North was built in 1998, called the loss of the district’s newest junior high building tragic.

“Something like this would hurt any time, but especially right here at the beginning of school. We’ve got 1,200 kids displaced and records destroyed,” he said. “Nobody got hurt. That’s the good part if there is a good part. Wegot everyone out of the building as soon as the fire started.”

Mayor Stubby Stumbaugh said he would call in State Police investigators on Friday and probably federal investigators since the loss was more than $1 million.

Stumbaugh, who took his RV to the school so firefighters could use the air conditioner to cool off, was emotional Thursday night as he talked about how proud he was of the way the community responded to the disaster and how thankful he was for the help from neighboring cities.

“I have never been so proud to be a mayor as I was today,” Stumbaugh said. Everyone worked together, he said, the police, fire department, water department, public works and even office workers from city hall.

“And not just city workers, there were teachers and coaches working out there,” he said. “You don’t know what a community we have up here. There’s probably as much bottled water up there as we used putting the fire out. And fried chicken and Subway sandwiches, we didn’t even know for sure who brought it all whether it was businesses or individuals, but we got so much we finally had to stop letting people in.”

At press time it was unclear exactly how the district would deal with the loss. ”We haven’t had a chance to circle the wagons yet,” Nash said.

Alan Turnbo, also a member of the school board, said plans for starting school are tenuous, but he believes it will start on time. Even before the fire was put out, school officials were trying to find empty classrooms in the district’s other schools to house the Junior High North students.

Using portable buildings is an option, but the portable buildings that were at the high school have been gone since school let out in May. More would have to be brought in and possibly set up in the low spot near the building that burned.
As the fire blazed, sobbing teachers comforted each other over the loss of what many considered their home away from home.

“I had just painted 50 white stars on an American flag mural in my room when we evacuated,” said one teacher, wiping away tears and pulling her daughter close.

A new forensics teacher to the district lost 12 years of teaching materials in the fire.

Onlookers gathered at the administration building down from Spirit Drive to watch the fire while Cabot School District employees carried bottled water and ice to the fire crews.

Billowing thunderclouds to the north and south gave one teacher hope for a passing summer thunderstorm to help firefighters stop the flames. But the rain passed Cabot by and Stumbaugh said without the help of neighboring fire departments, they could never have kept the fire from spreading outside the building.

“It did get out into the woods a little but they got it put out,” he said. According to a 2005 state educational facilities report, the school was scheduled to get $339,690 worth of fire and safety improvements in 2008.

Former Cabot School Supt. Don Elliott said, “It was a beautiful school. It’s a loss to the community.

“It’s terrible,” he said. “Things were looking so good with the new high school opening soon.”

”I have a lot of confidence in Dr. Holman, the school board and the principal School has to go on.”
Elliott heads the Cabot Scholarship Foundation, which held its annual banquet at the school cafeteria.

“It had the largest cafeteria in the district,” Elliott said.

Garrick Feldman contributed to this report.

Wednesday, August 09, 2006

SPORTS >> Injuries, heat aren't hurting Lions so far

IN SHORT: Searcy coach Bart McFarland says practicing in the hottest part of the day should pay dividends.

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

The 2006 Searcy Lions started out with 70 players last week for the opening days of summer practice, but found that number to be 10 players less heading into the second week on Monday afternoon.

Second-year coach Bart McFarland set the practices to begin during the hottest part of the afternoon, a move he says was done to prepare his squad for the long haul.

“We wanted to be out here in the heat of the day,” McFarland said. “We want to get these kids acclimated to the heat. This will be the time of day that we practice once school starts and that’s when we’re going to play, so we just wanted to get them used to it now and get some consistency in our routine.”

The numbers for the Lions break down pretty evenly. The group will be led by a core of 18 seniors, with 21 juniors and 21 sophomores filling out the team. The biggest difference between 2005 and 2006 so far has been injuries, or fortunately lack thereof for Searcy in the first stages of the season.

At least five key players for the Lions were hurt in the first weeks of practice last season, a disadvantage they never seemed to recover from all season, particularly on the defensive side. McFarland says he hopes the injury bug is a thing of the past.

“We have three or four out right now, hopefully they will be back,” McFarland said. “It’s nothing compared to last year, so far. We are just keeping our fingers crossed. We don’t want that epidemic to happen again. The key for us this year will be to stay healthy, that’s the main thing.”

A combination of summer weight lifting and 7-on-7 tournaments kept the team busy for the past couple of months. Although the first week saw the Lions undergo some conditioning drills, McFarland said the team was in good enough shape that the team could focus on strategy as opposed to conditioning from day one.

“Our linemen can stand to improve some, but most of our skill players are in really good shape. We did some conditioning, but we’ve mainly been working on fundamentals and technique. We have form tackled every day, even before we had pads.”
Most of the Monday afternoon practice was dedicated to hitting and tackling. The team broke up into three squads that rotated between hitting the tackling dummy, one-on-one contact and hitting from the line.

SPORTS >>Harding Academy down to 22 players

IN SHORT: The Wildcats will have a smaller team than usual during the 2006 football season.

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

Harding Academy began its second week of summer football practice on Monday in the heat of the afternoon. While walking onto the practice field where the team was lined up for warm-up exercises with the mercury pushing 100, head coach Tommy Shoemaker took the opportunity to break the monotony with a little bit of humor.

“Brrrrrrr, it’s freezing out here, fellas,” Shoemaker shouted. “We’re going to have to break out our snowsuits and overcoats before it’s over with today.”

The small squad responded with shouts of “Yes sir” as they completed a round of jumping jacks and leg stretches before moving on to the tackling dummy.

The coaching staff set up the Wrap-Up dummy outside the corner of the field house. The entire team took a shot at the dummy a number of times, until it ended up in front of the Harris Gym on the other side of the practice field.

With a total of only 22 players, the 2006 Harding Academy Wildcats will rely on experience rather than depth. They will have significant leadership, however, with seven seniors, most of whom occupy skill positions.

“It’s a little bit of a low number for us,” Shoemaker said. “But I think we still have quite a few players who are really solid.
“Having a low count doesn’t concern me, as long as we have 17 or 18 guys who have game experience, that have been out there and done it before.”

One advantage that the smaller team has over the Wildcats teams of the past few years is size.

Harding has not had its share of massive players in previous years, but with 255 lb. senior linebacker James Kee and 245 lb. offensive lineman Jonathan Wal-ker, the Wildcats will have res-pectable mass on both sides of the football.

The Wildcats will have quality experience at the skill positions. They are especially set at wide receiver, which is a crucial slot in Shoemaker’s offense.

Seniors Chris Pack, Brad London and Brandon Ragsdale will make up the core of the receiving team for Harding Academy’s full-scale spread assault, along with starting quarterback and former leading receiver Luke Tribble under center this season.

Although many of the positions have already been ironed out, Shoemaker says that not everyone will be in place until after the Wildcats’ Aug. 22 scrimmage against Beebe at First Security Stadium.

“We kind of have an idea of where everyone is going to be, but we really like to wait until the scrimmage to see who is going to stand out,” Shoemaker said. “You always have a few guys who will step up and show you something that they didn’t show in practice.”

As for practicing in the heat of the day, Shoemaker says getting his players acclimated to the heat was not a very big task. Most of the team has already played through the biggest part of the summer in the 7-on-7 program.

“The guys are in really good shape,” Shoemaker said. “We have done great with the heat, and we feel pretty good about what we are doing as far as providing enough water when they need it. They’ve held up real well; I don’t think it has hurt us much practice-wise.

“Coach Moats did a great job with them in the weight room over the summer to help with their strength, so things are going really well for us right now.”

SPORTS >> Injuries, heat aren't hurting Lions so far

IN SHORT: Searcy coach Bart McFarland says practicing in the hottest part of the day should pay dividends.

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

The 2006 Searcy Lions started out with 70 players last week for the opening days of summer practice, but found that number to be 10 players less heading into the second week on Monday afternoon.

Second-year coach Bart McFarland set the practices to begin during the hottest part of the afternoon, a move he says was done to prepare his squad for the long haul.

“We wanted to be out here in the heat of the day,” McFarland said. “We want to get these kids acclimated to the heat. This will be the time of day that we practice once school starts and that’s when we’re going to play, so we just wanted to get them used to it now and get some consistency in our routine.”

The numbers for the Lions break down pretty evenly. The group will be led by a core of 18 seniors, with 21 juniors and 21 sophomores filling out the team. The biggest difference between 2005 and 2006 so far has been injuries, or fortunately lack thereof for Searcy in the first stages of the season.

At least five key players for the Lions were hurt in the first weeks of practice last season, a disadvantage they never seemed to recover from all season, particularly on the defensive side. McFarland says he hopes the injury bug is a thing of the past.
“We have three or four out right now, hopefully they will be back,” McFarland said. “It’s nothing compared to last year, so far. We are just keeping our fingers crossed. We don’t want that epidemic to happen again. The key for us this year will be to stay healthy, that’s the main thing.”

A combination of summer weight lifting and 7-on-7 tournaments kept the team busy for the past couple of months.

Although the first week saw the Lions undergo some conditioning drills, McFarland said the team was in good enough shape that the team could focus on strategy as opposed to conditioning from day one.

“Our linemen can stand to improve some, but most of our skill players are in really good shape. We did some conditioning, but we’ve mainly been working on fundamentals and technique. We have form tackled every day, even before we had pads.”

Most of the Monday afternoon practice was dedicated to hitting and tackling. The team broke up into three squads that rotated between hitting the tackling dummy, one-on-one contact and hitting from the line.

SPORTS >> Falcons bring up numbers

IN SHORT: After a small turnout during the opening week of practice, the numbers have doubled for NP during week two.

By RAY BENTON
Leader sports editor

North Pulaski’s football team didn’t go full pads until Tuesday, but did get some good news when practice resumed Monday morning. After spending the first two days of two-a-day football practice (the Falcons didn’t start until Thursday) with only 19 players, a few more dropped in to participate Monday and Tuesday.

Monday’s practice consisted of 45 Falcons, and according to head coach Tony Bohannon, there are more to come.
“We’re expecting about 55 total,” Bohannon said. “We just have some kids that go out of state for the summer, and a few that still haven’t gotten their physicals, but when they all get here we should be in pretty good shape as far as numbers go.”

Another good sign from the NP camp is the conditioning of the players when they reported.

There has been very little trouble with the heat and hustle has been good.

“For the most part they were in fairly good shape when they got here,” Bo-hannon said. “We had pretty good participation in summer workouts and seven on seven, and it shows. Hopefully that will teach them that it does help.”

Week one brought a new quarterback prospect into the mix as well. Junior Melvin Tanner has joined Michael Fleschman as the potential starter under center.

Tanner didn’t play his sophomore year, but brings good size and a strong arm to the position.

Fleschman, a sophomore, has been the leading candidate through spring and most of the summer, but he is also one of the team’s best receivers, and could be of great use in that position if Tanner works out at QB.

“There’s still nothing decided,” Bohannon said. “It’s between those two, but we’ve got a lot of time to see who fits in best and where. They’re both going to be taking snaps that’s for sure.”

The Falcons still don’t have a place kicker, but Bohannon expects one of his dual-sport soccer players to fill that gap, although it’s not certain at this point.

“We’ve got one soccer player out here that I think will be able to handle that ok,” Bohannon said. We’ll just have to see how that goes. We’re not sure right now.”

One thing North Pulaski will have to do is grow up quickly through two-a-days.

Sophomores make up nearly half the roster, and many will be counted on to contribute in starting roles when the first Friday night arrives.

“We’re definitely young,” Bohannon said. “We’re going to have a very small senior class, but that may be a blessing.”

TOP STORY >>Victim's mom opposed to killer's early parole

IN SHORT: Michael Webb is the only one still jailed of four convicted in the Sherwood murder of a 17-year-old in 1993.

By RICK KRON
Leader staff writer

A convicted killer is up for parole, and the victim’s mother says it’s too early—way too early.

“My son was shot in the back. Murdered!” she wrote in a letter opposing the parole. “The scale of justice has not been served for my son’s life.”

Michael R. Webb, who is now 33, of Little Rock, was convicted in early 1996 of the December 1993 shooting death of Jason Hatcher, a Sherwood teen, who was 17 at the time of his death.

Webb is the only one of the four convicted in the incident still in jail.

Webb, who was 21 at the time of the shooting, was found guilty of first-degree murder and first-degree battery. He was sentenced to 40 years on the murder charge and six years for the battery count, to be served consecutively. So far he has served just about 10.5 years.

Webb asked for clemency in 2004, but he was turned down.

His parole hearing—his first—is set for Aug. 16. If approved, he could be released as early as Dec. 12. The victim’s mother, Kathy Hatcher; the Pulaski County prosecutor’s office and others oppose to Webb’s release met with the parole board earlier today. A final decision will be made Aug. 31.

Webb was one of four individuals involved in the shooting in the Harvest Foods parking lot in Sherwood, off Highway 107, just north of North Hills Boulevard. Prosecutors, according to the victim’s mother, did not try to prove which of the four actually shot Hatcher.

“Because of the accomplice liability law, the prosecutors set out to prove they were all guilty of murder by participating together in the actions that killed Jason on the night of Dec. 17, 1993,” Kathy Hatcher, who now lives in Ward, wrote in her recent letter to the parole board.

The prosecutors decided to try all four—Webb, Jason Carter, Chad Jones and James Gross—separately. Hatcher said this prevented jurors from hearing from others involved in Webb’s trial because of ongoing appeals. But Hatcher, who sat through all the trials, is convinced that Webb was the one who actually shot her son.

Carter, 18 at the time of the shooting and from Little Rock, was found guilty of first-degree murder, battery and aggravated as-sault.

He was sentenced to 60 years on the murder count, 30 years for battery and 10 years for the assault, all to run concurrently. He was paroled in March 2005.

Even though Carter got more time for the murder than anyone else, because of his age at the time of the shooting, an attorney general’s opinion allowed him to be paroled at any time.

Jones, 22 at the time, and a Cabot resident, was found guilty of first-degree murder and battery.

He was given 32 years on the murder charges and five years for the battery, to run concurrently. He was paroled in August 2004. Gross, 19 at the time, and from Gravel Ridge, was found not guilty of murder, but was convicted of battery and aggravated assault.

He was sentenced to six years on each charge, to run concurrently. He was the first to be paroled, in December 1996.

According to Leader articles and police reports at the time, there was a fight in the Harvest Foods parking lot.

Jason and others, who were at Taco Bell, came over to see what was going on. Gross, Tim McGarity and others were fighting.
About that time a car pulled up with Webb, Jones and Carter. Carter had a pistol and was firing it in the air as the vehicle pulled in.

Prosecutor John Johnson said apparently the pistol was passed around between Carter, Gross and Jones. McGarity ended up shot in the knee.

Shortly thereafter someone got a rifle out from the trunk of the car and began firing.

“By this time, “Johnson said, “everyone was running away and Hatcher was shot in the back. The bullet went completely through him.” In her letter to the parole board, Hatcher said police found lead fragments and copper casings at the crime scene.

She said the lead fragments were traced back to a gun found at Gross’s grandmother’s home. The copper casings were traced back to a rifle found at Webb’s home.

Copper fragments were found in Jason’s back, she wrote. Johnson agreed with most of Hatcher’s recall, but said the gun was found in Gross’s mom’s attic.

Johnson said the investigation found that Webb left the crime scene and went to the home of some friends. He walked in carrying his rifle and bragging.

Hatcher, in her letter, said that “Webb bragged to his friends by saying ‘I think I got one’ or ‘I think I shot one’ and that the worst part was he ‘had to throw his taco down.’”

Hatcher closed her letter, writing,  “I pray that you keep him in jail to show deterrence to other young people to not use guns, to show justice by giving punishment for murder, to make Webb take responsibility for his actions.”

SPORTS >> Panther volleyball

By JASON KING
Leader sports writer

Last year’s Cabot Lady Panthers volleyball team had plenty of talent, just not quite enough size to back it all up. From the looks of early practices this year, however, the size issue will be a thing of the past.

The Lady Panthers reported to the first practices last week in healthy numbers. A squad of 30, led by seven returning seniors, took to the Panther gymnasium to prepare for the 2006 season and their first venture into the 7A-Central Conference.

Head coach Terry Williams said the group came in ready to work on fundamentals, with very little conditioning needed.

“I feel like we are a little bit ahead of the game as far as conditioning goes,” Williams said. “Some of the girls worked with a trainer over the summer, and some of them worked on their own. Overall, they did a good job of reporting in good shape and ready for the first week of practice.

“They’ve been working hard. We still have a lot of spots open right now, our lineup has not been determined yet. There are still several positions that two or more people are going for, so it’s pretty wide open right now as far as who the starters are going to be in a lot of places.”

Even with a good core of seniors, --Williams says that starting positions will have to be earned with strong performances on the court, regardless of what grade each player is in. With several younger players adding much-needed height to the starting lineup could potentially posses more underclassmen than in years past.

“We have some height,” Williams said. “Some of them aren’t jumping real well yet, so we have been working on that. If someone has a 16” vertical (jump), we want them to use all of those 16 inches instead of just five or six.”

Along with morning practices at the Panther gym, the Lady Panthers are also taking part in a team camp at Hendrix College this week in the afternoon from Monday through Thursday. Sev-eral area schools are participating in the camp, including conference opponents Conway and North Little Rock. Among other schools at the camp are Vilonia, Morrilton, Greenbrier and May-flower.

With the luxury of two good workouts a day this week, Williams says the focus right now is on serving and passing, with emphasis on their hitting and blocking to come in future practices.

“We did a lot of passing and a lot of serving mixed in with our conditioning,” Williams said. “In fact, we are still focusing on our serving and our passing this week. Hitting and blocking will probably come in a lot more next week.”

The Lady Panthers will start their season at home on Aug. 22 with a varsity-only tri-match against Lonoke and Morrilton starting at 5 p.m.

EDITORIALS >> Casinos Royale

By winter, Arkansas will have casinos at Hot Springs and West Memphis, the first since Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller shut down the illegal ones at Hot Springs in 1968. The state Racing Commission last week gave the franchise owners permission to operate 1,000 gambling machines each. The Arkansas Supreme Court could block the casinos when it returns from its summer recess, but one of the franchise owners is confident enough about the court’s decision that they are already building the grand gambling hall and is ordering the machines.

Oaklawn Jockey Club at Hot Springs is more prudent. It is waiting on the Supreme Court to say that the elections last November in both cities were legal. They have good reason to be cautious.

While the Racing Commission’s licensing of the operations at the thoroughbred track at Hot Springs and the greyhound track at West Memphis is good news for those with gambling impulses and for the out-of-state track owners, people addicted to constitutional niceties are not so happy. The act passed by the 2005 legislature lets the racetrack owners open casinos if the games require at least a little skill, even if the outcome is still always based on chance. That is supposed to get around the Constitution’s ban on lotteries.

But the immediate issue is whether the elections in which local voters approved the casinos are valid and constitutional. The voting procedures were strange indeed. The legislation let the track owners choose the most propitious moment for the elections and who would get to vote on the issue. The tracks chose city voters only, not voters in the surrounding counties.

Past gambling votes indicated that city voters were more likely to approve gambling than voters countywide.

The track owners paid the election judges and clerks and other ballot costs. Local judges ruled that this and the unusual leverage over the elections given to track owners squared beautifully with the constitutional protections of free, fair and impartial elections. Now we must see if the Supreme Court agrees. If it does, we hope it is not a trend.